The Diary of Lewis Bramer, Jr.

Lewis Bramer, Jr.
See diary entry of February 25.
Photo courtesy of Richard S. Walling.

Lewis Bramer, Jr. was born, December 20, 1840, in Fabius, New York. He enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse, New York, in the Regimental Band of the 12th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He was mustered out, July 19, 1862, as a result of Public Law 165, passed by Congress on July 17, 1862, abolishing regimental bands. See Army Bands Online.

During his time with the 12th Infantry Lewis kept a diary, which has been inherited by his great-grandson, Richard S. Walling. The diary has been edited by Sandra K. Walling, and a version appears below, with permission. Copyright information follows the last diary entry.

Following the Civil War, Lewis Bramer became a businessman and was active in civic affairs in Fabius. A brief summary of his family history appeared in Onondaga's Centennial, Dwight H. Bruce, Editor, Boston History Company, 1896, Volume II, pages 147-148 of the section of family sketches. An online rendering of this memoir can be viewed at the biography section of Onondaga County USGenWeb. Lewis died in 1927 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Fabius.

A list of the band members appears at the end of this file.

A note about the editing: No attempt has been made in editing to correct spelling or grammar. In some places periods have been added to help the reader. Parentheses are Lewis Bramer's. Brackets are those of the editor, Sandra Walling. Question marks inside of brackets indicate those things that the editor still needs to verify or check.


January 1, 1862
[The diary begins with a sentence fragment ending in "Falls Church."] Went over to the camp of the 61st regiment, NYV near Alexandria. Saw Capt. Deming and his company around by Bailey's Cross roads where the great review was. Was at the Alexandria Seminary last night. There was a heavy cannonade north of us the rebels tried to cross the river but did not get across. Wind blows hard.
January 2
[missing fragment ending in "afternoon"]. I went over to the camp of the 23rd NYV a distance of 3/4 of a mile south of upton hill. There I saw Daniel Clough and Alvin Bailey. Staid there until after Dress Parade and then returned to our camp. The weather is a little colder to day than it has been any time since I have been here about like the month of March in Onondaga Co.
January 3
We drew our tents to day and the first thing that we done this morning was to pitch them in a pleasant place and prepare for keeping house. In the afternoon there was a grand parade and Sham Battle of Artilery, Infantry and Cavalry near Baileys Crossroads and it was a splendid sight. There was about twelve thousand men in the engagement and it lasted about four hours. Gen. McDowel was in command of the Division and is a fine appearing man. There was a fine hail falling this evening but it is not very cold.
January 4
Went into the woods and cut some crotches and poles to build a bedstead and built one for Frank [Slingerland] and myself and then took our bedticks and went about 1 mile to a house and got them filled with straw for which we paid 10 cents apiece. We drew our pants which were light blue and our coats which were dark blue Frock coats and 1 pr. drawers 1 pr socks + 1 shirt. do not feel very well to day. It snowed a very little this morning.
January 5
This morning we got our stoves, tin plates, spoons, knives and forks coffee pot, spider, wash dish, camp kettle, dish pan, tin pail and pork, rice, beans, sugar, coffee, Bread and salt. Then we built our table around the center pole of our tent, chopped a lot of wood and got our dinner and then busied ourselves in picking up around our tent until night. Alson Squires is quite sick to day. I feel good. It snowed a little tonight quite cold.
January 6
It is very cold this morning There is about 2 inches of snow which fell last night. Last night there was a skirmish of pickets within hearing distance and today the 24th NYV brought in their contraband. 1 prisoner of war and a horse and waggon and lost 2 men. We played outdoors at dress parade for the first time since we have been here. Alson Squires is no (by Eld Harroun) better. [Elder Harroun was a Methodist clergyman from Onondaga.] He went to the fort medic the care of Dr. Hills. I am well today.
January 7
It is not as cold this morning as it was yesterday. Went out and played for guard mounting in the morning at half past eight o clock. Band drill in our tent about two hours in the forenoon. One of the corporals in Capt [Augustus] Roots company died this morning with the Typhoid fever. Some warmer at noon. Went down in the field about 1/2 mile south from Upton Hill & had a drill on marching in the afternoon. The pickets near Lewinsville sent for reinforcements of 30,000 to attack the rebels and they were ordered to cook 3 days rations and march.
January 8
This morning we played for guard mounting and then played a dead march to march the corpse off the ground and then got a pass to go to fort Tilinghast with our trunk to send home. Took our dinner with Doctor Hills & Sam Skeels at the Fort. Saw Alson Squires he is some better to day. Doctor Hills doctors him. there is a report of a battle over near Lewinsville about 5 miles from here. I have not heard the result. I am a little unwell tonight. I have caught a little cold.
January 9
Feel first rate today. We played for guard mounting this morning. It is raining a little this morning and Begins to be a little muddy. We drew our rations to day for one week. I wrote a letter home to Frank Bramer today. Maj. [Henry A.] Barnum [Henry Barnum was later awarded the Medal of Honor] paid us a visit at our tent and we had a fine time. It was quite warm to day. Went down beyond the camp of the 22nd got some water was stopped by the guard.
January 10
This morning played for guard mounting. the mud is knee deep on the camp ground. We had a band drill in our tent this forenoon. In the afternoon Frank and myself went about 1 mile to get some rails to burn in our stove and almost broke our backs. The 22 Band just went out to meet their pickets and escort them into camp. It is quite warm and rains a very little. I feel first rate today. It is very foggy today. I wrote a letter to H.G. Meigs.
January 11
Played for guard mounting in the morning. After Break[fast] went in to the woods and got a log to cut for wood to burn. A Du[t]chman from the 20th came into our tent to hear us play in the afternoon and hearing us he went and bought 4 papers of chewing tobacco and 10 papers of smoking and gave us. Went down to the 24 to see them paid off this afternoon. It is a beautiful day but began to grow a little cooler in the evening. I feel first rate today.
January 12
Played for guard mounting in the morning then eat our breakfast and went down to the 23rd regiment, NYV to see Dan Clough he having a furlough to go home. I sent a letter by him to my folks. Then came back and Still [E. Stillman Doubleday] and myself went to work and made a wash tub of a pork barrel and went down near the 22 and got some water and we had a fine wash. This seems some like Sunday and is the first Sunday that I have sun since I have been here. This is a very warm and pleasant day and feel first rate. Rec'ed paper from home.
January 13
Played for guard mounting this morning. After Breakfast Frank and myself got some wood and then we went down to the sutler of the 24th and saw Hank Ritenburg [?] and bought a woolen over shirt of him. and paid $1.25 for it. We got our large practicing tent to day and also got some boards for a floor in our sleeping tent. Then we went to work and laid our floor. In the eve we had some visitors from the 23 and we got some sausages and made some pancakes and had a fine time. It is some colder today. Received a letter from [his brother] Byron.
January 14
It stormed so this morning so hard that we did not play for guard mounting as much. The band of the 24 got their new instruments this morning and I went down to see them and hear them play. Long Charley came thru driving around our tent last night it snowed very hard last night. In the eve Frank, [Edgar B.] Church and myself went down to the camp of the 24 regiment band to see their new instruments and we had a fine visit with the boys and returned before the pass word was given out.
January 15
Staid in camp all day. Recieved a letter from Byron today. went down to the sutlers and got some paper. it rained some today. Crazy Doud was in our tent it is quite cold here. Went down in the woods and got a stick to make a broom and commenced writing a letter to Byron in the evening. I am well today. Still is a little unwell. Frank is all right. [Lucien] Squires of the 23 took dinner with us. I weighed 154 1/2 with light undercoat on. Rec. a letter from Byron.
January 16
This a a beautiful morning the sky is clear and the sun shines warm. we cut a tree down close by our tent door and chopped it up for wood and got it into our tents. One of the 24 and two of the 14 Band was in our tent to see us this forenoon. Capt Wood [of Company A] paid us a visit and also Capt Clark of the 23 was here and staid some time. I signed the pay-roll to day. Am first rate today and played for dress parade this afternoon. Rec a paper from home.
January 17
Went down to the sutler of the 23 and bought some postage stamps this forenoon. The paymaster came this morning and after dinner we were paid off. I received twenty dollars from him. Sent a letter to Byron and one to Sam Younglove. I also rec one from Byron and one from Ben [his other brother] today. It is a pleasant day, but not very warm. I am quite well to day. There was a very heavy cannonading between eleven and twelve tonight in a south westerly direction. It was very hard.
January 18
It is very foggy here this morning. After breakfast I went over to the teamsters tent and read the newspaper. Came back and had a drill on music in the forenoon. Alson Squires came up here from the fort this morning. He is a great deal better. In the afternoon I went down to the camp of the 22nd NYV and got a pail of water. Still and [Harvey] Edwards has gone off to get a tick filled with straw for Squires as he is not able to go himself. It is very muddy I am well.
January 19
was attackd with a very sore headache and cold chills last night and it continued through the night and all day to day. It has also rained very hard last night and to day. I have been abed almost all day. went and bought some tea this morning. It is very foggy towards night. Maj. Barnum was in our tent this eve. I wrote a letter home this eve.
January 20
Played for guard mounting this morning after it Major Barnum called us all in to his tent and settled for the month of December and then I came back to our tent and got our breakfast and had a drill in the tent then went out and chopped some wood. It rained some today. I am feeling first rate. Wrote a letter to Wm. Waters.
January 21
It rained very hard this forenoon. I stayed in our tent pretty much all day because it was so muddy. In the evening Ed Church recd a large box from home. in it was his fiddle, three shirts, cake, cheese and several other things and we had a fine time eating fine things I am well today. Rec a letter from Byron and answered. [last sentence crossed out]
January 22
Charlie [Sutherland - band leader], [Levi] Martin and [Charles] Kellog went down to the city today to get some trimmings for our uniforms. We cut down a tree and made some wood. I rec a letter from Byron to day and answered it immediately. Edwards lies on his bed, reading, Still getting supper, Church and Frank is out somewhere. Squires and brothers [referring to Lucien and Meredith] is cutting up maple sugar. We are all well and it is a beautiful day.
January 23
Still and myself went down beyond the camp of the 24 to the picture gallery to see about getting some pictures taken. When we came back we stopped at the sutler of the 24 and I bought a pipe and some candles and came back home. In the afternoon Frank and myself went down into the woods with the boys in the other tent and helped them get out some logs to build a shanty for them. It is very cold and a little windy I am well to day and so are the rest of the boys.
January 24
In the morning Edwards, Church, Frank and myself went down into the woods again and helped get out the rest of the logs for their house while Still stayed in the tent to get our dinner and have it ready when we came back. Staid in the camp all of the afternoon and evening. Charlie, Martin and Barnum came back from Washington to night. It commenced blowing and snowing in the evening the boys are all well. Edwards and [ Eugene] Balsley got their new horns.
January 25
It snowed and blowed all night last night and cleared off very pleasant this morning. I went to the tent of the other boys and saw Charley Kellogg trim our uniform in the forenoon. Don Thatcher [Co. C] was here this forenoon. Went down to the camp of the 24th in the afternoon chopped a little wood for our tent towards night and in the eve we had a practice in our tent. I am well and so are the rest of the boys. Serenaded the Colonel this afternoon.
January 26
Played for guard mounting in the morning we had a drill in the forenoon after which Dan Griffin and myself went down to the 24th and also down to the Brigade sutlers staid a while and then came home. In the afternoon I rec a letter from Byron, one from Meigs one from Billy Johnson. In the eve I answered Byrons and Billys letters. Omer Colgrove [of the 13th Pa. Reserves "Bucktails"] came here about dark and stayed all night - all well to day. This is a very pleasant day and quite warm.
January 27
Ed Church and myself went up to Gen. Wadsworths headquarters to grind our axes but the grind stones was so fine we could not grind them. We came back and chopped down a tree and made some wood. The boys of the other tent are building their log house today. Omer went back after dinner. Played for dress parade in the afternoon. In the evening we serenaded the commissioned officers of this regiment at the Col and Major's tent. Had a fine time. We are all well to day
January 28
It is a very rainy morning and I wrote a letter to Byron this forenoon. Went down to the brigade sutlers and got a length of stove pipe to put out the top of ours [tent] so that it would not smoke. Charlie and Martin came in to our tent and played the fiddle for us for about an hour after dark. In the eve we went up and seranaded the Rev. Mr Filmore Pastor of the Park Church in Syracuse He was at the Col and Maj house we are all well today.
January 29
It is rather foggy this morning. After guard mounting I started for fort reunion on waggons with Frank Olcott after rations. We went by [Gen.] Blenkers headquarters and also by Fort Albany to fort Reunion [may mean Ft. Runyon]. When we got there we found our quartermaster there and we loaded up with flour and crossed the river by long bridge [now the 14th St. Bridge] and went to Washington from there we went to the Georgetown Bakery and unloaded our flour and then to the express office and got the express for the 12th and came south to the bakery and loaded up with bread and started for upton hill crossing the river by aquaduct [now Key Bridge]. the mud was very deep all the way. all well today.
January 30
It rained very hard in the morning and we did not play for quard mounting as normal. We staid around our tent and scarcely left it all day. We heard a rumor this afternoon that the militia was in Washington and that our Quartermaster had gone down after the Colonel to bring him up into camp. In the afternoon Frank and myself went down and bought some oysters and crackers and we had a fine Oyster supper and grand time. We are all well today. We did not do any duty today.
January 31
It is clear and pleasant this morning. We heard firing of artilery over on Munson Hill this forenoon and I went over. They were fring shell they said at rebel cavalry. As I came back I came across a company of the 23rd that were out firing at a target with their Enfield rifles. I staid a while with them and they came back to camp. Church and myself chopped some wood today. Ed Noble [cousin of Alson Squires] was here from the fort. We had a practice in the large tent. I received a letter from Byron and one from Sam Younglove. All are well here had a pleasant day.
February 1
It is a pleasant day and quite warm. After guard mounting I went in to the other boy's tent and got the trimmings for my cap and the lace for my shoulder straps and came back to our tent and trimmed my cap and made my shoulder straps while Charlie Kellogg was putting the trimmings on the collar of my coat. In the afternoon we came out and played a little for the officers. We are all well to day. We drew our rations for the week to day. It is quite cool to night.
February 2
This is a very pleasant day. Charlie Sutherland made a requisition and each of us drew a shirt one pair of socks and a pair of shoes. This morning I wrote a letter to mother to day. Capt [Ira] Wood was in our tent to day and he told us some pretty good storys of his life as a soldier boy. Squires rec his box of provisions from home to day. We are all well to day. Enjoying ourselves first rate.
February 3
In the morning we chopped a little wood and Charlie and Martin went to Washington this... I sent by Charley to get an instrument and paid him fifteen dollars to get it with. I borrowed five dollars of Edgar Church and sent my Mother ten dollars in a letter. In the forenoon Dan Griffin came into our tent and we had a practice. In the afternoon all the boys in our tent went in to the other tent and had a fine practice there It snowed a little all day. We are all well to day. Frank and myself went down to the 23rd to see Dan Clough but he was gone to the city.
February 4
We played at guard mounting and dress parade without Charley. Church and myself chopped some wood. I wrote a letter to Byron and one to Sam Younglove. We had a bad time last night with our stove. Harvey got up in the night and put some wood in the stove and it smoked very bad and I got up and went out in the snow storm and opened the top of the tent and turned the pipe around and it went better. Frank, Still and myself went down to the 23rd but did not see Dan. our box of provisions came tonight all well.
February 5
This is a beautiful day over head but soft under foot Played for dress parade at eleven o clock. The Orders for consolidation were read before the regiment and the names of the commissioned officers that were discharged Capts [Jabez ] Brower [Co. E] and [Dennis] Driscol [Co. C] and Maj. Barnum made speeches. Doct.[George B.] Todd [Asst. Surgeon] was here from the fort. Played for dress parade again at four oclock. Charley and Martin returned from Washington to night and brought me a second hand instrument. We are all well Man around fires last night.
February 6
It rained so we did not play for guard mounting. Capt Driscol and his 1st Lieut [refers to James Randall ] came into our tent to bid us good by before going to Syracuse. Charley came around and we had a good practice in the afternoon. I was attacked with a severe pain in my bowels towards night and it was followed by a relux and kept it up all night. I rec a letter from Byron and also a daily Journal. Sent Thatchers letter to him by Lieut [Edward] Drake [Co. I]. All are well here to day
February 7
I am feeling quite unwell this morning in consequence of my relux. I went out to play for guard mounting but was so weak I could not play much. I came back and did not eat any breakfast and went to bed. The boys had practice in our tent while I was abed. The Officers went down to the R.R. to meet the Militia and so did the teams go to bring their Baggage but they did not come I rec a letter from Byron I am better to night.
February 8
Played for guard mounting in the morning. The Militia came this morning on the cars from Alexandria They commenced clearing the ground and pitching their tents as soon as they got here. In the afternoon we came out and played a little for the new men and in the eve we seranaded the new Col [Henry Weeks] and he made a speech to us. Charley Kellogg came out with the drum corps to play for tattoo and had his drum kicked in by one of the privates. The fellow was arrested and put into one of our tents with a guard over him. I rec a letter from Byron tonight.
February 9
On account of the Militia coming yesterday we were not called upon to play for guard mounting Church and myself cut a little wood in the morning. I took a good wash and then commenced writing a letter to Byron After dinner Still, Church and myself went over to the rifle pit which was thrown up by the rebels. There was three rifle balls passed over our heads and one struck the ground within a foot from where I stood. Still went up to Head Quarters and got some splinters from the tree that was shot off by the rebels.
February 10
The sky is clear and the sun shines warm. Still, Edwards and myself took our dirty clothes and our tent kettles and borrowed Fraziers wash board and went down to the creek beyond the spring and washed our clothes and returned about three OClock and had a Rehersal and then came out and play in front of the Adjutants tent. There was a member of Co. K taken with the Small Pox it was said and they put up a tent down near the woods for him. We are all well.
February 11
Played for guard mounting in the morning. Frank, Still, Barnum Church and myself went up to the Docts tent and was vaccinated for the kind pox. Doctor Philips [of the 149th NYV] vaccinated the other guys and Doctor Todd did me. We had a rehersal this forenoon. Colonel Weeks and Major Barnum came into our tent to see Charley about some more muscians. After Charley left the Leader of the 24th Band played a few pieces with us. It snowed a little in the afternoon. All well to day.
February 12
After playing for guard mounting and we had got our breakfast Church, Squires, Frank, Still and myself started out for a little walk. We all went down to Munson hill and saw the Artilery Drill down on Baileys Crossroads awhile and Still and Church started for our picket lines and we went down where the Artilery was drilling and staid awhile and then came back and I got some supper. Actin J. Doud [Co. I] came here and took some supper with us. Still and Church returned about four oclock. Wrote to Ben.
February 13
Played for guard mounting this morning. After breakfast we had a rehersal in the tent in the afternoon. Still, Frank and myself went over on the hill north of here and got some old bullets that our men fired at the rebels when they drove them from their rifle pit there last August [Battle of Upton Hill - Aug. 27, 1861]. As we came back we stopped at the 20th NY S[tate]M[ilitia] and saw a thief drummed out of camp. He had his coat turned wrong side out. Gen Wadsworth was there. All well today. Rec a letter from Byron.
February 14
We did not play for guard mounting this morning because it rained a little. Band rehersal in the tent in the forenoon. Don Thatcher was here to day. We played for Dress Parade for the first time since the Militia came here. It was on a new parade ground west of the old one. I rec two papers from home and wrote a letter to Father and Mother. I did not go outside of the camp only to go to the Brigade Sutlers.
February 15
Played for guard mounting in the morning. It was so stormy that I did not go out of the tent much all day. Actin Doud came up here from the fort and was in our tent and staid some time he rode the Majors horse up. Some more of the militia came to day and the drum major was with them G. [George ] Colwell [Co. E] went down to the city with Frank Olcut [probably Francis Olcott of Co. E] and they both got threw from the waggon and was pretty badly hurt. I rec a paper from home. We are all well to day.
February 16
Played for guard mounting. After breakfast Edgar Church cut my hair and then I had a good wash. Alvin Baily [of the 23rd NY Vol.] and Lucien Squires came here and staid until after dinner and we had a fine visit - Crazy Doud was here and staid some time. Alson sits at the table writing home, Still is writing in his diary, Frank is toasting his shins and Church and Edwards are out visiting. Frank and and myself have got our clothes on the stove boiling in brine. I am well.
February 17
Played for guard mounting. It is a very stormy day and I did not get out of the tent during the day only to cut a little wood. I rec a letter from Byron. In the evening Church, Squires, Frank, Still and myself went to the Chapel tent and had a little sing and the Chaplain gave us some Books. The meeting closed with a prayer by the Chaplain. Lucien Squires staid all night with us. All well.
February 18
Played for guard mounting. After guard mounting we had a rehersal in our tent and after dinner Church and Still went with me to the daugarian galerys to get my picture but there was no one there and so I did not get one this time. After I got back I went up to the Chapel tent and looked over the Chaplain's books and papers and read some of them. We played for dress parade today. Will Allen [Co. E] played with us. One of the militia died with inflamation on the lungs.
February 19
Did not play for guard mounting . At half past ten oclock we were called out to play for the funeral. It rained quite hard all day. The corpse was taken down to Falls Church to be buried. In the afternoon I went to the chapel tent and got some books to read. In the evening Frank and myself went up to prayer meeting at the chapel. We are all well but Still and his vaccination has begun to work and he does not feel very well.
February 20
We played for guard mounting and after we were through Capt Ira Wood drilled us awhile on the parade ground. After breakfast I went down to the picture galery but did not find the artist at home. I came back and went down into the wood and got some wood and chopped it up and got it into the tent. I wrote a letter home in the afternoon. Played for dress parade. Still is better to night. Doud came up and stayed to day.
February 21
Played for dress parade. After breakfast we went over on the parade ground to have a little drill but one of the little drummers was taken with a fit and the Drum Major could not attend to it so we did not drill. We came back and chopped down a big tree close to our tent and cut it up for wood. Dress Parade to night. I received a letter from Father and Mother and Ben. Still is nearly well. He played with us today. I am well.
February 22
Played for guard mounting. The boys of the 12th Reg raised a nice flag staff out on the parade ground and at dress parade after beating off down the lines the regiment turned about face and we marched up and stood under the pole and as the flag went up we played the Star Spangled Banner. Then we went back to our places at the right of the lines and the orders were read out not to fell any more trees inside of the camp. After playing the regiment off the ground we went and stood under the pole and played Hail Columbia.
February 23
Played for guard mounting. After breakfast I got some water and washed myself all over and changed my clothes and then went in to the other tent and staid awhile. Charley and Doct Todd came in then and filled out Charley Griffins discharge [disability]. Will Allen and Jasper was in our tent and Jasper staid until after supper. We played for dress parade and for retreat. We are all well and enjoying ourselves first rate. This is a very foggy day and is very muddy. Quite warm [underlined].
February 24
After breakfast I went down to the daugerian galery to get my picture taken and did get one but my collar was so wide that the picture [?] looked did not suit me. But the wind commenced blowing so hard that I could not get any more taken to day so I came back on the hill and how the wind did blow. I found Dan Clough [23rd NYV] here and we went over in the north part of our camp and the wind blew over the 20th sutlers shanty and the boys went in for the spirits. It did not blow over our tent but came very near it. Did not have any dress parade.
February 25
Played for guard mounting and after breakfast Frank went with me down to the Daugerian galery and I exchanged the picture that I got yesterday and got two more good ones. than I came back and wrote a letter to Father and Mother and done up the pictures and sent one to Father and Mother and the other to Byron. Played for dress parade at half past four. Crazy Doud was in our tent in the evening and stayed all the evening. I helped the boys put up their tent that blowed down yesterday. I cought a little cold last night. [The family still has one of the daguerreotypes he sent that day. The picture of him at the beginning of this file was copied from it.]
February 26
Played for guard mounting. After breakfast I went down to the sutlers by the road and bought some licorice for my cold. After dinner went over beyond Munson Hill and had a Batalion drill and inspection preparatory for muster. One of the boys found a shell from a rifled cannon that had been fired and the back end was entirely blown off. The Artilery were practicing over on Baileys Crossroads and we could hear the balls whistle and shells burst very plain. No dress parade. Rained all night. Rec a letter from Byron.
February 27
Played for guard mounting. After breakfast I got some rotten stone of Charley and cleaned my instrument all up nice and then cleaned the buttons on my coat to be ready for inspection and muster for pay. The rest of the boys cleaned their instruments. In the after noon it commenced blowing again very hard and continued to blow very near all night. I am well with the exception of a hard cold.
February 28
After breakfast we were called out to be inspected and we stood there for about two hours when the Col. came along and said we could go to our quarters and he would send us word when they were ready and we would be the last. So we went into our tents and were called out again about two oclock and were mustered for two months pay. There was no dress parade to night. The Col. rec marching orders today by telegraph.
March 1
Played for guard mounting. I commenced writing a letter to Byron this forenoon. Still, Edwards and myself went over to the 20th and saw them start out to drill on pitching their small tents. Came back and saw Capt. Wood drill his company on bayonet exercises, stopped in Doud's tent and staid awhile. Frank, Barnum and myself went down to the 24th Band tents and then I came back and finished my letter. Went into the other tent and heard some fiddeling in the eve. Wind blowed hard last night.
March 2
Played for guard mounting. At ten oclock we attended the funeral of one of the militias and played a few pieces. At three oclock we came out again and played a while. They were putting the corpse into the ambulance and then we fell in behind the escort and ahead of the ambulance and went to falls church playing a dead march. After the salute was fired over the grave we marched back to camp playing a quick step. About 8 inches of snow on the ground.
March 3
Frank was unwell and did not get up to play for guard mounting this morning. After breakfast we made some fried cakes. We fried up pork and used the fat to fry them in and they were first rate to. I caried a pail full up to Charley and Martin and they praised them very highly. I rec. a letter from Ben Father and Mother. I am well today.
March 4
In the morning at ten oclock we went over to Falls Church to play for another funeral of the militia. It was very muddy. After dinner Charley went over to the 22nd to get Edwards' instrument rep[aired]. The Col. wanted us to play for a batalion drill and Frank and myself started after Charley but did not find him until we got to the 14th. We came back and went over beyond munsons hill to the drill. I had quite a talk with an old secesh there. Seranaded the Col in the eve.
March 5
Played for guard mounting. Frank, Squires and myself got our dirty clothes together and started with our wash tub to go over to the spring and wash our clothes. But we could not get any wash board so we postponed it until another day. One of the captains came over from the 20th to get us to go over and play for a funeral over in their regiment and so we went. I rec a letter from Byron and mother and one from E.D. Spalding. Wrote one to Ben.
March 6
Played for guard mounting. Squires, Frank and myself went over to the spring with our clothes and we washed them. There was twenty seven pieces in all and I done all the rubbing. We came back and got our dinner and I went into the other tent to hear the fifes Major from the 24th play. In the eve we went with the officers over on Halls Hill to seranade Gen Butterfield. we staid there until 12 oclock and started for home arriving in camp all right.
March 7
Played for guard mounting. Squires and myself went down into the pine swamp and got a lot of dry pine limbs for wood. I took our axes and went with Martin over to Head quarters and ground them and then came back and chopped up our wood. It is very pleasant and warm today and we are all well. Played for dress parade.
March 8
Played for guard mounting. Martin, Church, Squires and myself took our axes and went over beyond Fort Buffalo and cut some wood and came back and eat our dinner and then we got a team and teamster and went over and drawed it home leaving some for Martin and the rest for our tent. I then chopped some and got it into the tent. Pleasant day and all are well. Played for dress parade.
March 9
Played for guard mounting. Went up to Charleys tent and staid awhile and then came back and washed and changed my clothes. Frank and myself took a walk and coming back and stopped where Still and Doud were washing. In the eve we were awakened by a great stir in the camps around us. They have all had their orders to march tomorrow at four oclock. Very pleasant and all well.
March 10
I got up in the morning about day light to see the men advance. I went over to Wadsworths Head Quarters and saw him and his Staff start. Then came back and saw Gen. Auger's Brigade off. Went up and cut some wood for Charley as Martin had burnt his fingers so he could not cut any. Went down by the road and saw the Pennsylvania Cavalry pass. One of them showed me his carbine and how it works. Men have been passing by Baileys Cross roads all day. Rained some.
March 11
Played for guard mounting. A little before noon three or four of us started out for a little walk. We went down through the camp of the 23rd and over on to the Rail Road track and then went toward Alexandria. We got some considerable Laurel root and started by the track until we got opposite the 22nd and then came across stopping at the 22 and getting some things and then came home. I got a good Fatigue coat. Two companys of our reg. rec. marching orders tonight.
March 12
The two companys marched for Fairfax [county crossed out] this morning at four oclock. We went down into the woods and had a rehersal in the forenoon. Went down to the camp of the 23 with the other boy to wash but I did not wash for they had so much themselves. Came back and laid down and read. Martin came and wanted me to chop some wood. In the eve went up and heard some letters read from Barnum while he was at Centreville. Sam Sanders came here to day. Went down to Gen. Augurs head Quarters and seranaded Capt [ blank space] in the eve.
March 13
In the morning I picked over some beans and took them over to Doud's tent and baked them. Sam Sanders took dinner and supper with us. Cut up the Laurel root that I got the other day and made some rings and commenced to make a pipe but gave it up. In the eve went up to head quarters and seranaded the officers there and were invited into the house. It is very pleasant and warm. We are all well. Rec a letter from Ben.
March 14
Played for guard mounting. Sam Sanders started for his camp this morning which is the other side of Washington about three miles Horatio Ballards son, a Lieutenant was with him. In the afternoon I took a nap. In the eve we seranaded Capt Fowler and played Rosa Pike. then went up to Head Quarters and played a few pieces. Came back and Still cooked some meat intending to go to Bull Run with Capt Root and company. Rec a letter from Byron.
March 15
It rained so this morning that Capt Root and company did not go to Bull Run as they intended. Staid in the tent all this forenoon and read and wrote. In the afternoon went up to Charleys and staid awhile and then went up to Barnums and heard the stories of Bull Run and Manassas. Came back and wrote a letter to Byron. it rained all day. I am well.
March 16
In the morning the troops began to come back from Centreville and the Leesburg turnpike was literally lined with men, horses, waggons, and cannon until about three oclock. I saw Gen. Ord and Staff. They stopped on Munsons Hill and took their dinner. Went down in the woods and got some pieces of shell where the artilery had been firing. Saw Mike McGraw, Lucian Squires, A. Bailey, W. Allen, R Gasper, Wm. Frink, all came to our tent all most tired out from their march. Gasper, Allen, and Frink staid all night with us Still and myself was but four rods from one of the 20th when a baIl from a chance shot struck him in the bowels going near his liver and lodged in his spine. Helped pick him up and put him in the ambulance. We could not find out who fired the shot.
March 17
Frank and myself went and slept with the boys in the other tent last night and gave our beds up to Allen and Gasper for they were near whipped. They staid and took breakfast with us. Still gave up his bed to Mr. Frink. He would not stay until breakfast. The boy that was shot yesterday died this morning of the wound. Went up to Charleys and Barnums after dinner. Barnum bought him an Eb [flat] bass tuba of one of the 35th Band today. Saw a South Carolina State military Button. Very pleasant day. all well.
March 18
Played for guard mounting. Will Allen staid with us last night and took breakfast with us this morning. Went down to the 23rd and saw the boys. Bailey and Squires came back with me. The regiments around here started at three oclock for Alexandria. We all went down to the 24 and saw them off. they gave us a great many things. Went up to Charleys in the eve. I am well. This is a beautiful day. Played for dress parade.
March 19
Charley wrote a pass for me to go to Alexandria and I took it up to Head Quarters and the Colonel signed it. I then went down to the cars and waited for the train until about one oclock and it did not come and so I gave it up. At dress parade we rec orders to march without tents to join Butterfield's brigade now at Camp California near Alexandria. Wrote a letter to Father. All well.
March 20
In the morning Frank and myself went down to the 23 camp and washed all the dirty clothes we had so as to be ready for a march. Homer Call [Cpl., later 2nd Lt., and then 1st Lt. in 76th NYV] was here to day but but did not stay until we got back from washing It was very rainy all day.
March 21
In the morning we received orders to be ready to march at four oclock. We commenced to pack up such things that we did not want to carry with us. Frank and myself packed up our things in our trunk together and marked them to send home by express. At four oclock we were all in line and started for Alexandria. found the mud almost knee deep. Arrived in Alexandria a little after dark. Slept in the Church opposite the P.O. Buildings. All well.
March 22
Got up in the morning and eat my breakfast and went out to see the town. went to the Marshall house [hotel] and to the river and then went back to the Church and wrote a letter home. About 12 oclock went on board the John A. Warner and soon steamed off down the river amid the cheers of the crowd on the Pier and the band playing Dixie. After passing Ft. Washington, Mount Vernon came in view and the steamer slacked up as we passed and we played Star Spangled Banner. Slept in the cabin.
March 23
The Steamer run until she caught the rest of the fleet being 21 in number and then anchored. This morning I awoke about day light and went up on deck and it was a beautiful sight. As the sun rose up (which was in the west to me) the scene was splendid and we could not see land only in two or three places. All the vessels are sailing along in sight of us. We went way up on the huricane deck and played. Saw several Gun Boats and men of war. Anchored at Fortress Monroe about three oclock.
March 24
We staid on the boat all night in Hampton Roads. In the morning we went on shore in the ruins of the village of Hampton which Gen McGruder [CSA] burnt last spring. The Reg, pitched their tents just out of the village and I went down to the beach and got some oysters out of the sand. Struck our tents and moved a little further and then Frank and myself pitched our tents together and got our supper. Went into a vault where the secesh had broken the tomb stone and thrown brick in and broke the coffin.
March 25
We got up in the morning at daylight and struck our tents, packed our knapsacks and after breakfast started toward Great Bethel. we went about five miles and made a halt in the road and after a while we went into the lots and woods and pitched our tents. Built a fire and got our supper and went to bed. slept very cold. It is a very pleasant day and is quite warm. I am well.
March 26
Got up in the morning about four oclock (being so cold I could not lay in my tent) and started a very big fire right in front of our tent. Wrote a letter home today. we played for dress parade. It is a very pleasant day. Played on the color line in the eve.
March 27
Rec orders about four oclock this morning for a light forced march. We started with the rest of the brigade and marched out to Great Bethel. The Brigade charged on the breastworks but found no rebels. They set fire to the enemy's brush houses and went on. found fire burning that they had left. We started back and arrived in camp about sun down. eat some rice and went to bed. am pretty tired.
March 28
Went out on Batalion drill before breakfast because some of the boys discharged their pieces. came back and commenced to get some breakfast but had to go and play the regiment out again. Had dress parade and Brigade drill in the afternoon. The whole brigade fired their pieces and the dirt flew good. Went out and played in the color line in the eve.
March 29
Was in camp all day nearly. In the forenoon we played the regiment over across the road for batalion drill. The Colonel came to us after we were through and told us to report our selves to the band of the 44th New York and practice Brigade music with them 1 1/2 hours in the forenoon and the same in the afternoon but we did not do it. It commenced raining about dark and rained all night but we built a larger fire and were quite comfortable. Maj. Barnum was with us some time.
March 30
Got up in the morning pretty early feeling rather bad being cold and damp but the tent had kept the rain off pretty much so I was not as bad as I should have been. I built a good fire and took a good wash and felt better. It rained pretty much all day. I staid in camp all the while. Several of the boys of the regiment were arrested for taking boards and were tied by the hands to a long pole By the order of Gen. Butterfield.
March 31
Rec orders about day light to be in readiness to march at a moments notice. At about Seven oclock the bugle sounded for us to fall in and we started but did not go only across the road to get into a better camp. We pitched our tents in an open field where it was dry. We soon built a fire and drew our rations got our supper. played dress parade and retreat and went to Bed.
April 1
Rec orders this morning to practice Brigade music with the other bands of the brigade but we did not go. In the after[noon] we drilled ambulance drill on the stretchers under the direction of the brigade Surgeon. We played for two dress parades and three guard mountings to day. It is a very pleasant day and we are all well as usual. I have a boil on my arm. Received three letters and two papers from home to night.
April 2
Laid around all day until dress parade. Played for dress parade and then for guard mounting. Charley was taken with the chills and was afraid he was going to have the fever and ague. I wrote a letter to my folks to day. Went over in Company A and borrowed a postage stamp and in the evening I bought three of a fellow in Co. H.
April 3
Rec orders this morning for regimental bands to practice separately from seven to eight. We went over to our old camp and had a drill about an hour and came back, played the regiment into line for Batalion drill then I laid down and had a nap. In the eve we received orders to be in readiness to march with three days rations at an early hour.
April 4
Got up in the morning about half past three and packed our knapsacks and piled them up for the teams to carry. started about six. Saw Gen. McClellan at Great Bethel. The fortifications were very strong there being one behind another for a great way in the rear. Came to Harpers Mills about an hour before sundown. Here, our advance had a little skirmish and drove them out of their hole taking some firearms and stores. Staid all night there.
April 5
Started from Harpers Mills about seven. Commenced raining and rained pretty much all the way to the fortifications near Yorktown. The roads were very bad. We could hear the advance artilery firing on the enemy pretty much all the way. Arrived at the plains near Yorktown about noon and halted. Saw two Rebel deserters, and some of our wounded men. The artilery kept up a steady fire until dark. Prof. Lowe made a balloon ascension to view the enemy before dark.
April 6
The Pickets fired all night. After breakfast went down by the road where the Balloon was and saw it go up several times. Then went further up the road where I could see the rebel fortifications and the mouths of their cannon. Saw the first Secesh flag I ever saw. The artilery did not fire much but the pickets and sharpshooters kept up a pretty steady fire all day. It is a very warm day and all are well.
April 7
Got up very early in the morning and went over to camp and drew our rations for two days. Nothing has been done to day in the way of fighting only a few stray shots from the sharpshooters and Artilery but no one hurt on our side. We signed the pay roll and were paid off for the months of Jan. and February. Rec. a letter from home to day and put up our tent. It commenced raining a little before night and rained all night. All well.
April 8
The pickets kept up a steady fire almost all night. After taking my coffee and crackers I went out where the balloon was. It went up several times . Got up in the morning pretty well wet through and had a hard time starting a fire for it rained hard. I finally got it started and boiled the meat for our breakfast. Fixed up our tent that had come down through the night and staid in camp nearly all day. Commenced raining again towards night.
April 9
Drew our rations for two days. It rained all night and this morning. we picked out a new place for our tents across the ravine and pitched them. Built a big fire and dried the ground before pitching them. Edwards , Church, Frank and myself put our blankets together and made a large tent for us all close by the fire. It rained pretty hard for a while this afternoon but did not last long. Got up some wood for a fire to night. No Artilery firing to day but considerable many rifle shots were fired.
April 10
Had a good nights rest last night and felt pretty good this morning. After breakfast Bill Barnum and myself went over to camp and from there to the 44th Band. The leader went down to the woods with us where we could see the enemys guns and camps. Saw where the artilery men were buried that were killed. Went back to our camp in the woods and struck our tents and fell back preparing for bombarding the enemys forts. Encamped in sight of the fleet on the river. No firing of artilery to day. All well.
April 11
Slept very well last night only it was a little cold. Our regiment went out on picket this morning. I went down and washed myself down and some clothes. Came back and not feeling very well laid down and slept. The enemy came out of their forts and tried to flank our regiment and capture them but our boys charged on them with Maj. Barnum at the head and drove them back. Maj. Barnum shot two men with his revolver and one of our boys was wounded in the thigh, but nothing serious. I saw him.
April 12
Got up this morning not feeling very well. Went down around the point of the woods and onto the old field where the brigade was encamped. before our fall back. One of the boys picked up a six pound cannon shot that the rebels threw at our regiment yesterday which done no harm. There has been scarcely any firing to only two or three cannons fired and I have heard no small arms at all. I rec. a letter from Ben and one from Byron with some postage stamps.
April 13
Did not feel much better this [morning]. Barnum and myself went over to the 83rd and 44th sutlers to try to buy something to eat but they were all sold out. We finally found some cakes and cheese over in the Stockton [brigade] regiment. I wrote a letter to my folks at home to day. No firing much to day. The men are building bridges and fixing roads to be ready for the attack.
April 14
Did not feel quite so well this morning. In the forenoon we went over where the men were building a bridge across a little bay that ran up from York river. The enemy commenced building it to flank us but were driven back. In the afternoon I went over by the river and saw our gun boats fire the shells into the rebels over on Gloucester Point, they answered a few times. the secesh were trying to build earthworks to plant batteries there.
April 15
One of the little colored boys of our regiment was around our tent trying to steal some thing about three o clock this morning and we drove him away. He stole some money from one of the drumers and the officers searched his pockets and found it. They tied a rope around his arms and pulled him up into a large tree and let him hang a while and then the Col. told him to leave camp in half and hour and if he was ever in camp again he would be hung in ernest. Sent home $25 express.
April 16
Did not feel so well again this morning as I did yesterday. Quite early this morning the batteries commenced firing at some masked batteries that had been placed there last night by the rebels. Prof. Lowe discovered them with his balloon. Farther to the left was some pretty hard fighting and we could hear them plain. Our losses was pretty heavy and we took about fifty prisoners and one fort with fifteen guns.
April 17
Do not feel much better this morning. The rebels fired at our gun boats on York river from their fort the other side of the river. One of the shots a forty two pounder went right through one of our barges but did not touch the gun boats. Our gun boats sent them back their compliments a number of times. The batteries on our left and in front of us have kept up a pretty steady fire all day. The 12th went out on picket again to day but had no heavy skirmishes.
April 18
Do not feel as well today. Staid around camp all day. Wrote a letter to Byron to day. Our Regiment came in from picket this morning. no one hurt this time. There was some heavy voleys of musketry last night to the left of us. I have not heard the cause. Two or three regiments passed by here with some Gabions they had been making for breastworks which they fill with dirt and pound it down hard. Each man had one. I received a letter from Byron to night.
April 19
I am no better this morning. Some more of the Gabions have gone out in the advance for gunners to get behind. Martin and myself went down to the Brigade Qtr. Masters and got a pound and a half of black tea. I got some drops of Doctor Hill for the diareah, felt better after taking it. Went over to the 83rd PA. Sutler and bought a pound of cheese came back and eat my supper. It commenced raining a little before dark and rained very hard. The firing was kept up all day at intervals.
April 20
It rained pretty hard all night. This morning Major Barnum got us a Sibley tent and a wall tent and we went to work and put them up in the rain. It continued to rain all day. Got some more medicine of Doct Hills to day. Our new Surgeon [Charles Hubbell] came to day. The firing was continued to day but not so sharp as for two or three days past. Did not move in to our new tent to day. Our regiment went out on picket again this morning.
April 21
It rained a little this morning and we went over in the woods across the ravine and got some poles, crotches and brush and put up our beds in the sibley tent and moved our things into it and commenced to get ready to live again. It commenced raining again about four o clock and rained until I went to sleep. The regiment came in from picket this morning no one hurt this time though they were fired at a great deal but were not allowed to return the fire on account of men at work out there.
April 22
Slept better in our new tent last night to get up off the ground. A part of our reg. went out on fatigue to work on our fortifications to day. Went up to the Barbers and got my hair cut and was shaved. Rec a letter from Eld Harroum today which was advertised. Some of the sharpest and quickest cannonading over in front of us today that I ever heard. New tents (shelter) came for our regiment to day. The boys came in from fatigue about four oclock. Leiut. Drake found the 61st to day three miles from us.
April 23
It is very pleasant this morning and quite warm. Ed Church was attacked this morning with a very severe pain in the stomach and it lasted about an hour, he was very bad off. I went over in the woods and cut some chestnut logs and split them up and made some sticks for a bed and then came back and made a good bed. One hundred and fifty of our regiment went out to support our breastworks and batteries to night. Church is better to night. The wind blows quite hard this evening.
April 24
I got up this morning at day light and built a fire and put over a kettle of beans and had them all cooked when the other boys got up. I feel better today than I have before in a long time. The boys that went out last night from this reg. to support batteries as they supposed came in this morning having worked on breast works instead of guarding batteries. I wrote a letter to my folks to day and also received one from them. Not much firing until almost night.
April 25
It is very cool this morning and it clouded up and rained a little in the afternoon. We got some shovels and pickaxes and dug a ditch around our tent so the water would run off. A part of our regiment was detailed to go on picket tomorrow and were ordered to be ready to go at four oclock in the morning. There is not much firing to day except the gun boats fired a few shots at the rebel batteries on the river in the eve.
April 26
There was a little skirmish over near where we were encamped before moving here between the Sixth Mass. and a body of rebels in which we took fourteen prisoners and killed and wounded nearly all the rest. We lost two men killed and quite a number wounded. Our men shot one of the prisoners for refusing to come with him. Our regiment went out on picket this morning. It rained all day almost without ceasation and was pretty cold.
April 27
It is some warmer this morning. There was some very sharp cannonading for a few moments this morning directly in front of us and was kept up at intervals all day by our batteries and gun boats. Our regiment came in from picket this morning feeling pretty good after laying out in the rain for twenty four hours. Frank is rather unwell to day. I am feeling first rate. Went up to our sutlers and bought something to eat. Got up some wood for a fire in front of our tent. Our regiment went out on fatigue to night.
April 28
The boys of our regiment that went out on fatigue last night came in this morning without any causalities. Went and split up a large pine log into boards and made a floor for our tent. There has been considerable firing of artilery on our front to day. Gen. [Henry] Slocum was here in our camp to day. I saw him. His staff was with. I rec a letter from Ben today. There is a story here that New Orleans has fell into our hands and is pretty burned.
April 29
Commenced writing a letter home but Hiram Foote of our regimenal Band who has been detailed as guide for this regiment came to me and wanted I should go out on the lines with him and I went on his pass. We went clear out on the works where our regiment was at work and in sight of the enemys fort. I saw several rebels skulking around their works. Several bullets passed over our heads from the enemys sharpshooters and ours answered them very promptly. I saw some ten inch morters and a large pile of shells.
April 30
We were ordered to clean our instruments and be ready for inspection so we cleaned them and at eleven oclock we went out and formed in the rear of the regiment and stood there about three hours until it commenced raining and Gen. Butterfield who inspected us ordered us to our quarters and we went. In the afternoon two of Butterfield's staff came to our tent and mustered us for pay. Finished the letter that I commenced yesterday. Sharp firing on the river to day. J. Cross and H. Congdon died this morning [of disease].
May 1
Went out towards Martindale's head Quarters and saw the battle between our water battery and the one of the rebels water batterys further up the river and about one and one half miles apart. I could hear the shot and shell strike and hear them burst. they make a great noise going through the air. The Leaders of the 14th Band was here and went up to see Charley with me. Charley is getting better. Johnny Cross and Henry Congdon were both buried to night.
May 2
I am not at all well this morning and have felt bad all night. Our regiment went out on fatigue this morning and they had not been out long before the rebels commenced firing shells at them and they kept it up all day. none of them was hurt and they brought in several shell that did not burst. Charley Kellog went out with them. he brought in some pieces of shell. I received a letter from Byron today. I am feeling pretty good to night.
May 3
There was firing on both sides pretty much all night and a little before morning. they threw some very large shell which struck and burst very near our camp. They kept it up all day at intervals and in the afternoon. Gen. Porter and McClellan went up in the balloon near our camp and no sooner up in sight than the enemy commenced firing at it and they came down in quick time for the shot and shell fell pretty close to it. The shore batteries had quite a brisk fight. They threw shells in the fore parts of the right very close to our camp.
May 4
Got up this morning pretty early and there was a great commotion all around the camps. Our regiment rec orders to hold themselves in readiness to march at a moments warning. We received orders to take our instruments and report to the 44th where all the Bands of this Brigade were and played a few national airs and then played two pieces for the officers of our regiment and Maj. Barnum made a speech. The rebels left Yorktown and our cavalry and artilery chased them up close.
May 5
It rained this morning when I got up and rained nearly all day. Several Prisoners and a large secession flag were brought in to day. Men that have been over to the fort and say the rebels left a large amount of cannon and any quantity of small arms. they buried a great many torpedoes and shell so they would burst when stepped on. Heavy firing is heard in the direction of Williamsburg to day nearly all day. Rec orders again to be ready to march with two days rations.
May 6
Went over across the ravine and practiced a few pieces when the orders came for us to report to head quarters of Gen. Butterfield to practice with the Brigade band. After playing a few pieces and the Gen. presented us with six bottles of Champane. Charles Sutherland, [Fifes] Maj. Pixley and Edgar Church left here to day for the Hospital. We played for dress parade and guard mounting to night and some national pieces in front of the Cols. tent in the evening. Wrote a letter home to day
May 7
Got up this morning pretty early and after breakfast we went over across the ravine and had a good long practice. Received orders to have four days cooked rations in our haversacks and be ready to march for Yorktown and embark on board a steamer destination unknown. We were woke up in the night and ordered to be ready to go at three o clock in the morning. the orders were countermanded.
May 8
Did not get up very early this morning. About three oclock the General was sounded and we played a piece and then struck our tents. We started for Yorktown passing through our works and into the fort at Yorktown. Went all oven the fort and saw the large guns, all of them spiked and loaded. Saw the Breech loading rifled cannon from England and also a great many torpedoes which were buried. Saw Albe Abbott, Marvin Button, and Henry Lawrence [all of the 61st NYV]. Embarked on board The Louisiana about midnight. Rec a letter from home.
May 9
This morning about three the boat started off and between six and seven she cast anchor at West point. We staid on the boat until the afternoon when we landed in small boats on the Battle Field of Tuesday. The men were burying the dead on the ground. Played a few times on the boat this morning. Stopped and stayed a while with Berdans Sharpshooters and saw their new mini rifle which they got yesterday. Saw Charley Gibbs here this morning. All are well here to night.
May 10
Got up this morning and eat my breakfast and the three of us went down to the landing and got our box and tent and came back. We then put up the tent and then I went down to the river and took a good salt water bath. Drew a few rations and made some bean soup. Went down to the creek next to the woods and saw where the heaviest of the fighting on tuesday was. Played for dress parade and for retreat. All are well as usual except Frank. he has the rheumatism.
May 11
Went down to the river this morning and staid awhile and then came back and wrote a letter to my folks. While I was down by the river General McClellan rode up to Porter's Headquarters. Some that were near him said he told them of the blowing up of the Merrimack and the evacuation of Norfolk. After finishing my letter I went down to the river again and staid awhile. This is a very pleasant day. Rec a letter from Byron to night.
May 12
Got some water and built a fire and boiled some corned beef and then some beans. Went down to the river and bathed. Played for dress parade and then for guard mounting. Two of our boys caught a nice lot of fish out of the river to day. Frank is not much better to day the rest are all well. We received orders to be ready to march at five oclock in the morning with three days rations in haversacks.
May 13
Got up this morning at five and was soon on the move. We passed over the battle ground of the seventh and found the trees pretty badly cut to pieces with balls. We arrived at Slaterville about four oclock. Here we fell in with Hooker's division and marched to Cumberland [landing]. The advance of the army had a little skirmish with the enemy here to day. We encamped here for the night in sight of the Pamunky river which was full of transports loaded with provisions.
May 14
Got up and made some coffee and then went down to the Pamunky river and took a good swim among the boats there. One of Co. K got drew in under a steamer and came very near drowning. He was finally taken out by men in small boats Came back and put up our tents. It commenced raining about noon and continued to rain all day and all night. I saw General Porter for the first time. The whole Division was called up in line to receive Secretary Seward to night. He rode through with his hat off.
May 15
Got up at day light and packed up our things and fell in for a march. We marched down to the road and found Gen. Franklin's Division had just commenced to pass We stood here in the rain until noon and then started on our way to [Cumberland - crossed out] White house but did not go more than half way before the road was blocked full of Government wagons. We stopped and staid all night in the woods. It rained all day and some in the night.
May 16
Got up quite early in the morning and again started on our march. After [word missing] through the woods and water up to our knees we arrived at White House about ten oclock in the morning. We pitched our tents within thirty rods of the river which was full of transports and gun boats. I then went down to the river and through the Negroes quarters where there was a great many old and young of both. Played for guard mounting to night
May 17
Went down to the river and an order came for us to report to Gen. Porter's Head quarters. We did report but it was a mistake in our Colonel. Went to the woods and played a few pieces and came back to camp. Drew up a paper asking for our discharge and presented it to the Colonel. I received a letter from Byron to day. Played for dress parade and guard mounting and in front of the Col. tent in the eve.
May 18
Went down to the river after breakfast and took a bath and changed my clothes then came back and wrote a letter to my folks. The regiment drew some new clothes and I got one pair of socks. Received marching orders to march in the morning. This is a very warm day. There was a General inspection this morning by Butterfield. Played for dress parade and guard mounting this afternoon. I am well today.
May 19
Revilee beat out day light and I got up and cooked some rations for my haversacks. eat my breakfast and packed my knapsack and about six oclock started our march. We marched about seven miles to the Turnstalls station on the Richmond & York River R.R. The bridges on the road were burned but the track was not torn up. Played for dress parade and guard mounting.
May 20
Went down on the Rail Road to the Station and water tank and staid awhile then went down the other way to the place where the 50th NYV regiment were rebuilding the R. Road bridge that the rebels burned on their retreat towards Richmond. Moved our tent to the left of the regiment near the Doctors quarters. Played for dress parade and guard mounting this afternoon. All are well to day. Received orders to march in the morning. It rained some this evening.
May 21
Revilee at five oclock and strike tents at six and marched at half past six. we marched until two oclock and about eight miles. Here we encamped for the night and found the best water I have seen in Virginia. it rained some in the morning when we first started but soon cleared off and was very hot after it. Frank and some of the boys went to a house a little way off and got some hot biscuits and brought them into camp. Rec orders to march in the morning at five.
May 22
Got up at half past three struck our tents and was ready to march at half past five. We marched about eight miles and arrived about one oclock. It was very hot. We had a very severe Thunder shower about three oclock. There was only four of the band that arrived here with the regiment and they were pretty tired. I stopped about two miles back of the camp and came up in the afternoon some of the boys did not get here until after midnight.
May 23
Got up in the morning and went to the pond close by and bathed came back and got my breakfast and then took down our tents to move over in the other woods where Gen Butterfield was before he moved. There was some very tall[?] firing in the direction of our bridge and there was various storys in regard to the cause of the firing. All are well of the Band.
May 24
After breakfast Balsley, Squires and myself started out to catch some fish but had only dug our bait when it commenced to rain quite hard and we went back to our tents and staid awhile until it stopped raining and then went out and I caught one bullhead which I eat for my supper to night. It rained considerable to day and this evening. Still and Foote went off to a farmers house to stay all night.
May 25
It is quite cool here this morning. After breakfast I commenced writing a letter to my folks when Marvin Button, O[rin]. Allen, Walter, [Luther] Robbins and Estes of the 61st NY came into our camp and staid some time. I got some dinner for Orin and Marvin which was fried potatoes and Bacon and bread. The boys look fairly and seemed to feel well and satisfied with their fare as soldiers. I finished my letter to my folks to night. All are well.
May 26
At day light we were awoke with orders to march and we got ready to march as soon as possible but not with the regiment. We waited until our pickets came in and then fell in with them and marched to our camp on a nice farm near New Bridge and owned by a Doctor which our men arrested as soon as they arrived. We put up our tents and got our supper and went to bed feeling very well.
May 27
Rec a letter from Byron this morning of the 20th. Started on a march very early this morning. We got nearly to Hanover when our advance came upon the rebels and the 20th NY and Berdans Sharpshooters engaged them with some Artilery. I came up and stopped at the Hospital when the rebels came up in our rear and attacked us. They drove our men at first until our reinforcements came up and soon ended the fight for the night. The 44th in our brigade was in the last. The rebels left everything they had and the dead and wounded lay in every direction. Still, Squires and myself were the only ones (of the band) that found the regiment to night.
May 28
Got up this morning before day light and went to the fire and got warm. Went down to the spring to get some water and near the spring lay a rebel with the top of his head taken off by a rifled cannon shot. Close by where I lay last night was another one with a piece of a shell through his breast and they were scattered all over the ground. Our men have been bringing in prisoners all day. Mac [Gen. McClellan?] was here today. All the stragglers of the band came in today. Hiram Foote came tonight with our haversacks. Our men have been burying the dead all day.
May 29
This morning I got up about half past two to get warm and did not go to bed again. As soon as it was daylight I got my breakfast and got ready for our march back to camp. The band all went down to the Hospital and staid there until the regiment came along. While we were there a number of prisoners were brought in. About four we started for camp and marched until three in the morning.
May 30
Arrived in camp about three oclock this morning and was almost tired out. I went to bed as soon as possible and did not get up until noon. I eat some dinner and laid down again and took another nap went to bed early this evening.
May 31
Got up this morning feeling somewhat rested. I wrote a letter to my folks to day. There was a continual roar of cannon and musketry all this afternoon in the southerly direction from us and some of the time it was very severe. After I had gone to bed orders came for our regiment to go out and support the men that were throwing a bridge across the broad creek. They did not call for us.
June 1
This forenoon we got ready and started for our regiment. We lost them and went a way past but soon found out our mistake and came back and found them. There was a barn filled with tobacco close by and the boys were all busy making cigars. Another brigade came out and relieved us and our reg came back. Frank and myself staid out to see our batteries shell the woods. We saw our surgeon cut off a mans leg below his knee. He was secesh and there was thirty of them in the barn. Rec a letter from Byron to day.
June 2
Our Paymaster came today. The 83rd Sutler came with some stores this afternoon. I went over and bought some cheese and as I came back Still came to me and said the Colonel had just told him that the Paymaster had orders from the war department to discharge all Bands in his section and that we were to be discharged and sent home getting our pay when we got in Washington. All the boys of the Band myself included was overjoyed with the news.
June 3
The news of our discharge spread through the bands of the different regiments and all day we were crowded with musicians from other bands to find out the truth of the thing. The Paymaster paid off the regiment to day but did not pay any thing to us until one of the boys asked him if he was not going to pay the band and he said he had orders to discharge the band and not pay them In the [?] Frank and myself went down to Co I and staid awhile.
June 4
We have not yet been officially informed as to our discharge. One of the 14th NY Band came over to day and wanted to buy my horn and I sold it to him for twelve dollars. It has rained nearly all day to day and the river is very high. The Paymaster made out our discharges today and sent them off to be signed and Gen McClellan would not sign them if we would be of any service to the regiment. Col. Weeks assured him that we would not be of much service.
June 5
This morning the batterys of ours had a sharp engagement with the rebels out on the front over on our side of the river and the other on the other side. It lasted about two hours and a half when the rebels retreated and it ceased. Martin and Barnum went out there and the rebels fired two shots at them. Maj. Barnum came over here and got some beef for soup and said he was going off after dinner to see about our papers and he did go.
June 6
This morning a part of our regiment went out on picket and a part on fatigue duty. None of the boys were hurt but two of the 14th NY was shot by the rebels while at work on the bridge across the river. We have heard nothing about our papers to day. All the boys are well and waiting patiently for the papers to come. It is very cool to day we almost need an overcoat on.
June 7
Nothing of interest has transpired here to day everything being very quiet and no firing at all. Our Sutler came this morning with a load of stores. I bought some sugar cakes of him. I received letter from Byron to day and commenced to answer it but did not finish it to day. The Major told Bill Barnum that our papers would be ready inside of ten days. All are well today and waiting very patient for the papers to come.
June 8
This is a very pleasant day but very chilly. I finished my letter to my folks to day. The Leader of the 18th Mass came over to day and wanted to buy all the horns that there was in the band. He took a list of them and went home to see his Major. I am rather unwell to day having had a very severe headache and pain in the Bowels which brought me down considerable. It is very cool to night.
June 9
Feel very bad this morning but about noon began to feel some better. There is a grand review of Porter's Corps here this afternoon and Gen PRIM [?] with three other Generals was here they were all French Generals and Gen Prim is commander of the French army. It is quite cool to day and occasionally it rains a little. There has been no firing to day on either side.
June 10
There has been no firing to day and nothing else of interest has transpired here to day. everything is quiet and still. I received a letter from Byron to day with one dollar in money and four stamps in it. I wrote another immediately to him to explain our fare here. Was informed to night that Gen. McClellan would not sign our papers until after we get to Richmond. It is very cool today. I do not feel very well.
June 11
There is no firing this morning and every thing was quiet until almost dark when the Artilery had a nice little time for a little while Lieut's Drake and Estes went over to the 61st to see how the boys stood the fight. They report that Orin Allan was killed and C. Kenyon and M. Estes wounded and Joel Perrington wounded and missing. Quite cool to day. I do not feel very well.
June 12
Do not feel much better this morning. There has not been any cannonading to day only some very heavy over on the James River or in that direction. Otherwise it has been very quiet all the while. Maj. Barnum came down to our quarters this eve and after confiring with the Doctor said he would set some papers a going that would get us our discharge without fail. It is very hot to day.
June 13
This morning the Surgeon, Major and Colonel wrote a letter to the medical board stating the order of the war department and our inability to serve the regiment and requesting that we be discharged. Our Regt. went out on fatigue this afternoon. We did not go. The whole division was called out on the report that the rebels were in our rear out near Hanover. They did not go far before they found the report to be false and returned.
June 14
This morning the report came that the rebels had attacked our waggon train and burnt all the wagons hay and grain taking all the teams and killed and wounded and took prisoners of the teamsters a number of them. They nearly all belong to this brigade and four of the wagons and eight of the men belonged to this regiment. Received orders to appear before the medical board for examination and we did and met with a favorable reply.
June 15
It has been very quiet all day there having been no firing and nothing of interest having transpired in the camp as the regiment has not come in yet from fatigue. I received a letter from Byron to day with some stamps in. I do not feel very keen to day.
June 16
To day the last of our teamsters came in that were out to Garlicks Landing when the rebels cavalry attacked them the other day. Our regiment came in from fatigue this afternoon. Went down to the Stockton [brigade] sutler and bought a can of Fresh Lobsters for Frank and myself.
June 17
Do not feel very keen to day. Our teams started this morning about five oclock for Dispatch Station and one of the drivers by the name of Smith was thrown from the mule and one foot hung in the stirrup and his head was all smashed by the wheel. He was brought back to camp and sewed up in a blanket and put in a box and buried. No firing was heard to day at all.
June 18
Feel some better this morning. We received orders to be ready to march at a moments warning without knapsacks but we was not called upon to day. The rebels drove in our pickets out near Fair Oaks this morning which was the reason of our order. Doud was here this evening and wanted we should come over to his quarters in the morning and go with him and try and find Omer Colegrove as the bucktails were in this section.
June 19
This morning Frank and myself started after breakfast and found Doud and then took the Hanover road in persuit of the bucktails. We finally found where they had been but had marched this morning early for Mechanicsville so we came back without finding them. It is very warm to day.
June 20
This morning I went down to the creek and washed a shirt and a pair of stockings. The rebels commenced throwing shells about nine oclock and kept it up until noon. One thirty two pounder struck in the orchard a little east of our camp and some struck in the woods in front of us and several to the right of us and near Porters Headquarters. Our batteries did not reply. No one was hurt. Dr. Hubbel stood under a tree and one of the shells passed through it just above his head.
June 21
Got up this morning about sun rise and eat my breakfast and got ready for a march. The reg. started before we did and went around the road. In about an hour we started and went across the lots and through the woods, a great deal nearer route and we arrived in camp which was about two miles. After pitching our tents Frank, Dan and myself went off through the woods and got some cheries. Our regt. went out on fatigue to night throwing up redoubts in front of our old camp.
June 22
There was some very heavy cannonading and musketry to our left through the night last night. Our regiment came in this morning about three oclock. This morning Eugene and myself went down to the [blank] and staid awhile in the shade and then went to the creek and took a good bath.
June 23
Got up this morning feeling a great deal better than I have before in a long time. Drew our rations to day. Marvin Button came here this forenoon intending to go back to night but a very severe thunder storm came up and he concluded to stay all night. He says the boys from Fabius of the 61st are generally in good health. This afternoon there was some heavy voleys of musketry and some artilery to our left
June 24
Feel first rate this morning. Button staid with us all night and until after dinner and started for home. There was the hardest thunder shower last night in the night that I ever knew and the pickets had a pretty hard skirmish too with both cannon and muskets. There has not been much firing to day on either side and every thing is quiet.
June 25
This morning the light artilery over near Gaines House opened up on the rebels and was soon replied to by the rebels with large seige guns. Toward noon our men got their large guns to bear on them and they kept up a hard fire until they silenced the rebel batteries and then the fire was all on our side. It was kept up until dark. Orders were sent to be in readiness to march at a moments notice without knapsacks. I went up on the hill and saw the shell burst in the rebel camp. Wrote a letter home to day.
June 26
It is very quiet this morning and all the forenoon. Received orders to march with knapsacks and we started about three oclock and marched out to Coal [Cold] Harbor to meet Jackson's force but soon turned around and marched back. The battle then commenced out near Mechanicsville and we started for there and went a little beyond Gaines mills and it was dark so we stopped in an open field and staid all night. The firing was kept up until about ten oclock. The Bucktails opened the fight and were pretty badly cut up.
June 27
This morning we got up at day break and moved over near Gaines house where our men drew up in lines of battle and we (the band) started across the river to McClellans Headquarters. We stopped on the other end of the bridge awhile and then came across and found our teams. The rest of the boys of the band were there. I saw Eleaser Clough of the bucktails, he was all right. Did not know how Omer Colegrove was. They had a hard fight over where I left our regiment. Our regiment was cut up pretty bad.
June 28
We stayed all night where the waggons was but in the morning they were gone so we got up before day light and started for Savages Station and found the teams there. Hundreds and Thousands of wounded men were brought in here and there was quite a number of them belonged to our regiment. We left the station with the teams after noon and went as far as White Oak swamp and staid all night. The regiment overtook us about half way between the two places.
June 29
This morning we started with the regiment and marched until about noon and halted when the regiment formed in lines of battle in the woods and staid here until long after dark when we started and marched a ways and we turned around and backed up for we ran right around the bend in the road right on to the rebel pickets. We came back a piece and laid down for the night on the ground.
June 30
This morning we got up and marched into an open field built a fire and made some coffee and were soon on the march again. We marched very fast until we came in sight of the James River and into a wheat field and encamped. The regiment was soon called out again to meet the enemy as they were following us up very fast and the battle was pretty hot. Maj. told us to stay in camp unless they were driven back and then make our way to the landing. The gun boats came up and took a part in the fight. We left the camp and went towards the [Harrisons ?] landing.
July 1
We came as far as the wheat field where the waggons were and slept there all night last night. This morning we got up and started again and went almost to the landing then turned around and went back and met our teams and staid with them there until they moved to the river and I went with them and staid with them all night. I went down to a negro house and got some hoe cakes for the boys as we were almost starved out. Frank got on the boat with Lieut. Drake who was sick. Major Barnum was wounded to night.
July 2
This morning we awoke very early and it had just commenced to rain and we packed up, left the teams and started for some negroes houses and had them cook us two hens and some hoe cakes and we eat our breakfast which we enjoyed very much. We then started for Hamiltons [maybe means Harrisons] Landing as the sick wounded and straglers were all going that way. We found our regiment there. We went into the woods and built a tent and the Lieut. Col., and Capt. Randal staid with us.
July 3
This morning we got up and was just about to arrange our camp when the shells began to come and the reg. was ordered to fall in and we (the band) were ordered to take the Adjutant to Porters HeadQuarters. Still and I lost the rest of the boys so we went down to the hospital and staid in the yard all night. Saw a great many sick and wounded of our regiment here. Several Prisoners were here in a large square. I saw Albe Abbott and Marvin Button to day.
July 4
Got up this morning made some coffee and got some soup and crackers at the hospital and eat my breakfast. We then started out and found the regiment. The bands were all got out or what is left of them that has horns and played a number of National pieces and cannon were fired in honor of the day. There was a grand review of the troops which was a splendid sight. Gen's. Butterfield and Martindale made speeches.
July 5
The companys commenced to regulate the camp and so we picked out a new place for our tents and cleared it up and pitched our tents and then Dan and myself went down to to river and took a good wash. staid there awhile and came back to camp.
July 6
This morning got my breakfast and then wrote a letter to Byron. Dan and Still went down to the river and Doctor Hubbel got them to go on board the John A. Brooks to assist in taking care of the sick and wounded soldiers that were to be taken to Fortress Monroe.
July 7
I received a letter from Byron this morning dated July 2nd and in the afternoon received another dated June 26th. Some of our regiment were detailed to unload our clothing from the boats and the clothes were delt out to the regiment. I drew a pair of pants and a pair of shoes.
July 8
Every thing is quiet here to day. it is very hot. President Lincoln and the Secretary of War were here to night. The troops were all in line and gave them three cheers as they rode by. General McClellan was with them.
July 9
The Rebels fired into our mail steamer as she was coming up the river this morning with the mail but our gun boats soon stopped their fun. It is very hot to day.
July 10
It has been very quiet to day not a gun has been heard. It was very hot until about four oclock when it clouded up and we had a very severe shower.
July 11
To day the regiment were all inspected to find out what clothes and arms we needed. The Colonel told us he would have us mustered out of the service immediately. It is rather rainy today and quite cool.
July 12
Every thing is quiet to day. I went down to the 44th and staid there awhile and returned. Saw the papers which spoke of the dismissal of the Regimental bands and the establishment of Brigade bands.
July 13
I had not been up a great while when Morris Boss and Rowley of the 61st came over here to see me. I went with them to the hospital to see Doud and while we were there Omer Colegrove came there. After a good visit I went back to my tent and wrote a letter home to my folks.
July 14
Went down to the river with Eugene this morning and staid two or three hours and then came back to camp. Albe Abbott came here then and staid awhile and I went with him over to the Bucktails and saw Eleaser Clough and Omer Colegrove and had a good visit with them and came back. Albe then went back to his camp.
July 15
Charley Kellogg and I went a great way to find a sutler to buy a knife and pipe and finally found one. I got me a knife and a pipe. Came back and we went to the Brigade Commisarys and got some flour and yeast powder and made some pancakes and biscuits and we had a good feast. We had a very hard thunder shower tonight. We were mustered today for the months of March, April, May, and June.
July 16
It was very clear and pleasant this morning when I got up to day. Marvin Button came here and staid some time. He told us that Albe Abbott got his discharge and started for home yesterday. We had another very severe thunder shower this evening. I received a letter from Byron this evening and in it was a letter from Frank Slingerland who was at home.
July 17
This morning it is very clear and pleasant again. Omer Colegrove came here this morning and after breakfast I went with him to Homer Case's tent and staid some time. Morris Boss was also here to see me but I did not see him. The regiment got out and cleared and burnt up every thing in the shape of rubbish clear to the creek in our rear.
July 18
This morning Lieutenant Col. Richardson came down to our quarters and told us that our papers had arrived at last and Lt. Harrison was to muster us out of the service. I went with Barnum over to the fifth artilery to see Harrison and from there to the Bucktails to see Omer and Eleaser then came back to camp. From there I went to General McClellans Head quarters to get some mustering out blanks but I did not find any.
July 19
This morning Lieutenant Harrison came to our camp and mustered us out and we started and went down to the river with all of our baggage but the boat had gone. In the afternoon I went over to Harrisons Quarters to get our papers but he was not there and we found him at the landing. We then had our papers made out to go to fortress monroe. Still came back to day. I wrote a letter to my folks to day. Bill went on board the Louisiana with the Major.
July 20
This morning we got up very early and eat our breakfast bid the boys good bye and started for the boats. We got on board the steamer John Zucker and sailed at nine oclock. The gun boats escorted us past all the dangers and we arrived at Fortress Monroe at three. Got on shore and went around the fort some and at five we got our passes and got on board the Adelaide bound for Baltimore. I got a good dinner on board the John Zucker. We found Bill [Barnum] at Fortress Monroe.
July 21
I awoke this morning very early and went up on deck and saw fort McHenry and another in process of manufacturer. arrived in Baltimore at half past five and took the cars for Washington at twenty minutes of eight and arrived at ten. took the bus for Mrs. Dwyers where we left our things and got our dinner then went with Capt. Higgins to see about our business but could not get our pay as the papers had not come. Capt. then went with us and got a pass for each of us which will last until the 26th.
July 22
This morning after Breakfast we started with Captain Higgins to get our pay and after running all over the city we finally got our pay. Mine amounted to $119.28 mileage and all. We then came back and got our dinner and then I went around the Capitol with the rest of the boys. In the evening I took a walk down Pennslyvania avenue and then went to bed for I set up with Captain Randall last night.
July 23
This morning Captain Higgins went with us to get our discharges but we could get nothing but a pass to get out of the city. We then went down to the Government Storehouse to get the trunks that belonged to us then rode to the express office and expressed three of the trunks and had the rest taken to the Depot. Then went and got my dinner. In the afternoon I run around the city some and bought some clothes.
July 24
The boys all got up at day light this morning, but Squires, Balsley and myself, and got ready for a start on the six oclock train this morning and got their breakfasts and were off before I got up. After I eat my breakfast we went to the patent office after there to the Smithsonian Institute then to Washington's Monument and after dinner got ready to start for the 3 1/2 train. Got our supper in Baltimore and left there at half past nine oclock in the eve.
July 25
Rode on the cars all night and slept very well. We arrived at Elmira about twelve o clock and eat our dinner and started for Binghampton a little before one o clock. When we got to Binghampton we found Barnum, Still and Martin who had come by the way of New York. I saw Homer Boss here. We arrived at Apulia and rode over in the stage with Hobart and arrived home a little before dark. The Band came and seranaded me and then I went up to Mr. Cadwells with them to seranade Lucien.
July 26
I did not get away from home much this forenoon there was so many here to talk with me about their friends in the army. Hobart brought my trunks over this morning. Mrs. Slingerland came over and got Franks things about noon and took them home. In the afternoon I went to Mr. Boss, Mrs. Clough, and Mr. Staffords then went to the shop until supper time and came home. After supper I went down to the post office and staid until the mail came and then came home.
July 27
This morning I was attacked with the diariah pretty hard. I did not go to Church to day. I was not well enough so I staid home all day. Hiram Warners girls funeral sermon was preached at the Baptist house by Eld[er] Blount in the afternoon. Eld[er] Hastings preached at the Methodist house at four this evening.

 

CLOTHING RECEIVED OF THE U.S.
Jan 41 dress coat$6.62
Jan 41 over coat$7.20
"
1 pr. pants$3.03
"
1 pr. drawers + shirt$1.76
"
1 pr. socks$  .26
"
1 Cap$  .62
Feb. 21 pr. socks$  .26
"
1 pr. shoes$1.94
"
1 Blanket$2.95
May 181 pr. socks$  .26
 Total$30.43

 

CASH ACCOUNT    
JANUARY 1862
JAN 1 - CASH ON HAND $7.00  
JAN 6 - paid sutler        $  .13
    straw   .09
    for paper   .05
JAN 7 - F. Slingerland   .25
JAN 11 - sutler for comb   .15
    for postage stamp   .03
    Rec of E.S. Doubleday .15  
JAN 13 - Paid for shirt   1.25
JAN 15 - for paper   .05
JAN 16 - sent for book   .10
JAN 17 - Paid for stamps   .50
JAN 18 - recd of paymaster 20.00  
JAN 19 - paid sutler   .15
JAN 23 - sutler in 24th   .85
    peddler for apples   .05
JAN 25 - Rec of Edwards for stamps .10  
JAN 28 - Paid sutler   .25
JAN 29 -      "   .10
JAN 30 -      "   for oysters   .11
JAN 31 -      "   for raisens [?]   .12
    Rec of Eugene for pipe .75  
TOTAL     $28.00 $4.73
February 1862
FEB 1 - Cash on hand $23.83  
FEB 3 - rec of Ed Church 5.00  
"
  Paid C.H. Sutherland   $15.00
"
  Sent Mother   10.00
FEB 4 - Paid sutler   .10
FEB 7 -    "   for Forney War press [?]   .05
FEB 8 -    "   for envelopes   .20
FEB 12 - paid peddler   .28
FEB 14 -    "   for stamps   .30
FEB 20 - Rec of Ed Church 4.00  
FEB 25 - paid for pictures   2.00
"
        "    Buttons   .10
FEB 26 - postage for pictures   .25
"
-    "   Sutler   1.00

© copyright Lewis Bramer, Jr., transferee Richard S. Walling, 7071 Balmoral Forest Road, Clifton, Virginia 20124, February 28, 2000. The diary is an unpublished work. All rights are reserved.


Members of the Regimental Band,
12th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment

I have checked in the Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York for the year 1899. Albany: James B. Lyon, State Printer, 1900. In that source (on the pages indicated) I found the following information for the men in the regimental band. For whatever reason, the ages of the men enlisted into the band, unlike almost all other enlistees, were not given.

Page 8
BALSEY, EUGENE.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, band, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862.

Page 10
BARNUM, WM. L.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, band, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862, place not stated.

Page 20
BRAMER, LEWIS.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, December 1, 1861, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862, place not stated.

Page 32
CHURCH, E. B.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as a musician, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862, by act of Congress.
[Name has been found elsewhere as Edgar B. Church.]

Page 51
DOUBLEDAY, E. STILLMAN.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as a musician, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862.

Page 57
EDWARDS, HARVEY.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862, by act of Congress abolishing regimental bands.

Page 77
GRIFFIN, CHARLES L.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged for disability, March 12, 1862, at Fort Ramsey, Va.

Page 77
GRIFFIN, DANIEL.—Age ,-- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862, place not stated.

Page 103
KELLOGG, CHARLES.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862.

Page 119
MARTIN, LEVI.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, band, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862.

Page 174
SLINGERLAND, B. F.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged to date, July 19, 1862, Special Order No. 28, Headquarters Department of the East, Philadelphia, Pa., February 6, 1868.
[Name has been found elesewhere as B. Frank Slingerland.]

Page 179
SQUIRES, ALSON M.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as musician, July 19, 1862, to serve seventeen months; discharged, same date, act of Congress abolishing regimental bands.
[I suspect that the "mustered in" date reflects an error in record keeping at some level. Name has been found elesewhere as Alson N. Squires.]

Page 184
SUTHERLAND, CHARLES H.—Age, -- years. Enlisted, December 1, 1861, at Syracuse; mustered in as band leader, same date, to serve seventeen months; discharged, July 19, 1862, act of Congress abolishing regimental bands.

Go to my 12th NYVI Web Site.

woosterk@cortland.edu
Kenneth Jennings Wooster
27 Abdallah Avenue
Cortland, New York 13045-3302
File created: May 6, 2000
Modified: May 11, 2000; May 24, 2000; July 23, 2000; December 26, 2000; January 2, 2001; March 3, 2001

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